Practicing with Night Vision

Discussion in 'Night Vision/Thermal' started by wigwamitus, Nov 1, 2014.

  1. RattlesnakeDan

    RattlesnakeDan San Antonio Texas LSB TURKEY BUZZARD PRESERVATION SOCIETY SUS VENATOR CLUB LoneStarBoars Supporter

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    Do you hire a small band of pygmies to carry that for you Wiggy?
     
  2. wigwamitus

    wigwamitus LSB Active Member

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    Haha, it is 14 pds 2 oz without the 14 and 14 mount, per the postal scale.
     
  3. RattlesnakeDan

    RattlesnakeDan San Antonio Texas LSB TURKEY BUZZARD PRESERVATION SOCIETY SUS VENATOR CLUB LoneStarBoars Supporter

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    I would use a tripod with a wheel.
     
  4. Curly Shuffle

    Curly Shuffle LSB Active Member SUS VENATOR CLUB LoneStarBoars Supporter

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    I couldn't pick that up!!:) UGH UGH!!
     
  5. wigwamitus

    wigwamitus LSB Active Member

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    Yeah, it is embarrassing but the 5.56(18) is actually heavier than the 6.5G(18) ... and I got the 5.56(18) specifically to be my "light rifle". Those ancient Daniel Defense rails probably weigh 2 pounds. One day I will replace them with seekins and save a pound and a half probably.
    ==
    Here is the 6.5G(18)

    [​IMG]

    The gun as shown is 13 pounds 7 oz. (no mag and no clipon). With a magazine with 15rds it is 14 lbs 8 oz. And with the thermal clipon and 15 rd mag it is 15 pounds 11 oz. I didn't weigh it stripped, but it is pretty light. I'd guess 7 pounds.

    The RAPTAR is 10.8 oz, so not super light ... it all adds up !!

    ==
     
  6. Shooter

    Shooter Bedford, Texas SUS VENATOR CLUB LoneStarBoars Supporter

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    when it is all said and done what do you figure that weapon plus all the goodies weighs. Disregard/ you answered as I was posting.

    what area are you from
     
  7. Rookie

    Rookie LSB Member

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    Brigand Arms – Innovative Weapons Systems

    I have one of these on my rifle. It's super light.
     
  8. wigwamitus

    wigwamitus LSB Active Member

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    I am from the area known as the Flint Hills of Kansas. :)

    ==
    Oh that does look super light!
     
  9. wigwamitus

    wigwamitus LSB Active Member

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    2017-12-16
    2200-2230
    40F
    10 MPH S

    Goal: Coop Patrol

    Environment: Breeze from South, overcast, no moon.

    Equipment: 5.56(10.5) PAQ-4C, 77gr FM(r) Spartan-3, Helmet PVS-14, PAS-29

    [​IMG]

    Activity: Fired up NODs in garage before I went out the door. I don't always do that. Saw opossum at 25yds immediately. Aimed laser, saw eyes, fired, drt. The spot was right under the normal, guinea tree, but we have encouraged the guineas to stay in the barn for the rest of the winter, so they are fine. The opossum was 35yds from the coop.

    [​IMG]

    Saw the cattle out in the alfalfa patch bedded down.

    Heard some yotes to the East within a mile, but at least 600yds on the other side of our Signal Hill.

    Summary/Results: During "banzai" season, from last week of Oct thru mid-Nov this year, I think the count was 14 coons and opossum and 1 yote, all within 100yds of the coon, most within 50yds, some within 25yds. I think I've only gotten 2 since then and then this one tonight. I did see a yote within 100yds on Thursday night, but only had the ODIN with me. I ran it off, but could not shoot it with no weapon.
     
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  10. wigwamitus

    wigwamitus LSB Active Member

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    2017-12-19
    2200-2230
    30F
    10 MPH S

    Goal: Coop check

    Environment: Stars, clear, breeze, no moon.

    Equipment: Equipment: 5.56(10.5) PAQ-4C, 77gr FM(r) Spartan-3, Helmet PVS-14, PAS-29 (same as post above)

    Activity: Went out, saw critter (opossum or Coon smallish) in tree within 10 yds of coop. Aimed laser fired, this was 45yd shot I am zeroed at 50yds. Critter feel out of tree and onto creek bank. I did not head down to get it last night.
    Here is pic this morning

    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Dec 20, 2017
  11. wigwamitus

    wigwamitus LSB Active Member

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    I like the RAPTAR so much, I got two baby brother radiae. One for my shooting buddy and a backup for me.

    [​IMG] upload_2017-12-20_22-35-28.gif

    Though the RAPTAR has an ir-laser and the Radius has a viz laser, I zeroed the Radius to the scope reticle using the same process I used for the RAPTAR.

    01 - Mount Radius on the 12 o'clock mount over the scope
    02 - Activate vis laser in the house.
    03 - Co-witness to the scope reticle.
    04 - Mount the 14 scope adapter and the PVS-14 on rear of scope.
    05 - Move everything out side and setup.
    06 - Turn on the 14
    07 - Aim at mineral feeder 415 yds away.
    08 - co-witness the laser to the scope reticle.
    09 - Check the distance = 416yds
    10 - Check distance to fence post = 77yds (check)
    11 - Check distance to telephone pole = 106yds (check)

    It works!

    And just like with the RAPTAR, with my eye still on the target, I can see the distance with my other eye without moving.
     
  12. wigwamitus

    wigwamitus LSB Active Member

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    We talk more about our "good sheit" ... but I'm in the process of redoing my helmets for the first time in 3 years ... and everything is torn apart in flux, so I decided to take one of the backups to the backups out for one of my nightly checks ... a Bushy Equinox 4.5x digital NV. I threw a T-20 ir-illum on it to give it a bit more power.

    [​IMG]

    After getting outside and turning things on and getting focused, I spotted a deer at 250yds to the SSW coming over a ridge heading straight for me. The eyes were lit up by the T-20 ... the deer continued to the 200yd mark where it jumped the fence ... continued to the 175 yard mark and jumped another fence, then finally turned East ... I continued to watch it until it disappeared into the Turtle Creek gully. I scanned about. I could see a mineral feeder on top of the ridge at 415yds to the SE. I could see an Owl in a tree at 100yds. I could not see anything in the alfalfa patch. Illuminators are not good at seeing things thru tree lines, which thermal can see. The illumination bounces off the trees (or any vegetation) and washes out the view. Much like white light does. But I was still impressed that this setup had some use. Had any critter been within 100yds of the coop on the ground I couldn't seen it, with the exception of in the Apple Orchard. As to critters in the trees, it would depend on whether there was any blocking vegetation.

    ==
    Later I went out with ODIN 1x 17mm 320(30) and was able to see the cattle in the alfalfa patch working on 2 bales I put out earlier. I could not see them with the equinox/t-20 setup but could see them with the thermal, again showing the plus of thermal being able to see critters thru even small gaps in tree lines.
     
  13. ZapEm

    ZapEm LSB Member LoneStarBoars Supporter

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    Flint hills area..... got a good friend up there that flies a SuperCub. Lots of critters.
     
  14. wigwamitus

    wigwamitus LSB Active Member

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    2018-02-09

    2018-02-10

    1700-0500

    20F

    15 MPH N


    Goals: Hogs and Yotes


    Environment:

    Friday: 76F when we arrived, quickly down to 21F with winds 20-25 MPG from N

    Large Fields, 0.5 to 1 mile per side, very flat and open terrain, Cows, Deer, Yotes, Pigs, Coons, Skunks.

    Saturday: Temps in the 20s all day and night. Winds a little lower 15 MPH N.


    Team and Equipment:

    Dave: Pulsar Quantum, 50mm, 384, 6.5(16), Trail 640, 50mm, 123 SST, Ram 1500

    James: 5.56(10.5), Pulsar APEX 50mm, 384, 62gr TSX, PVS-14, PAS-29, Bushy LRF

    Joe: 5.56(10.3), Mk3 60mm, Patrol, PVS-14, 62gr TSX


    Activity:


    Friday:

    Rolling and scanning fields near WF, TX

    Wind conditions and distances involved made PID difficult. Smaller scanners could detect, but often I would hear calls to "Put the big one on it", meaning fire up the 60mm and try to PID.

    A number of initial mis-identifications were made, but eventually corrected with additional study.

    No critters were taken Friday night. All the pigs we saw were in fields we could not shoot.


    Saturday:

    Rolling and scanning fields in Mantag Cty, TX

    More hills and trees, but still fairly large fields.

    We got one boar. I spotted it from several hundred yards distance and eventually we were able to stalk up to it.

    James knocked it down with 1 shot from 125yds.


    [​IMG]


    As we closed up to drag it to the truck, it was still moving. The shot had completely paralyzed the 2 front legs, but the rear ones were still moving.

    We gave it a mercy shot.

    Had to drag it up a hill and put it on the truck. Girth was 42.5 inches, so est. 225 pds.

    Later on that same property we missed when shooting at another group of hogs. Not knowing the distance caused us to aim high. We learned from that to measure the distance before each emgagememt.


    Back in WF, we revisted the proerties from previous night.

    We were rolling through one field stopping and scanning. James had my Patrol and 14 on his head from right rear seat. He called out "something moving 5 p'clock to 3 o'clock.

    I was scanning out front right seat with 60mm and called "yote with no tail". I had never seen a yote with no tail, but that is what I saw, so I called it out.

    Dave, out of vehicle scanning with 50mm called "tail is tucked".

    I asked James to give distances. Using LRF and 14 he was able to provide several range updates over the next few minutes.

    Dave tried calling it, but that caused it to move away more quickly.

    He tried calling it again and it laid down facing us.

    James called out 205yds. My hold was 6 inches up at that distance.

    Dave said "Pop it". I timed breathing to put reticle six inches over neck at top of breathing cycle and fired.

    Yote rolled over, legs in air.

    Dave and James could not see it clearly but I called out it was dead.

    Turned out the hit was 2 inches under the left ear.


    [​IMG]


    Later we decided, the yote realized it was "cornered" and went to ground as a defensive measure.


    We saw a group of about 10 pigs in a field we could not shoot, but just across the road from a field we could shoot.

    We stalked into the field we could shoot and tried to call the pigs from 100yds. No reaction.

    Closed to 75yds called again. No reaction

    Closed to 50yds called again. No reaction

    Closed to 25yds called again. The pigs ran in the opposite direction. :D


    Not a great night for calling !


    Rolling, James detected something about 500yds in a field. WIth 60mm on 9x I thought it was a pig, but was not sure as it was end on.

    We rolled another 50yds and it turned, still end on. We repeated 3 more times with it continuing to turn as we moved. Eventually I called PID on pig.

    We rolled in to the field and stalked final 300yds to 100yds, lased the distance and fired with no hold and got this lone boar. It was smaller than the previous one. It did not detect us.


    [​IMG]


    By then it was 5am again.


    ==

    Summary: Knowing the distances to the critters in the large fields is critical as there are no landmarks.

    The patrol, in its first outing, was very useful, though we used it on 2x most of the time, but it still had a very clear image.

    The 14 and LRF were very useful at providing distances.

    The best long distance spotter we had was the 60mm Mk3, which still had a good image on 9x.
     
  15. wigwamitus

    wigwamitus LSB Active Member

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    I haven't tried the Mk 60mm as a clipon yet (to busy using it as a rifle scope) ... but I thought I'd try the new IR-Patrol.

    [​IMG]

    That's the Patrol in front of a Burris xtr2 1.5-8x cq-mil scope.

    The reverse USGI 3x (pvs-14) magnifier is screwed in to the back of the PVS-14 lens on the rear of the patrol. This shrinks the clipon mode image in the patrol and might also extend the focal length of the lens on the rear of the patrol. However it works, I'm getting about the same 8x out of this sucquer I got out of the SNIPE. Those of you making hollywood movies out of the backs of your day scopes might need to stop at 5-6x, but it is WAY better than the 1x you get just using the raw 14 lens on the back of the patrol.

    Thanks to Pete Lesbo of i2 tech for the tip. I don't care what they say Pete you are a GENIUS !!! :D
     
    der Teufel likes this.
  16. wigwamitus

    wigwamitus LSB Active Member

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    2018-03-04

    2130-2230

    40F

    30 MPH SW


    Goal: Coop patrol


    Environment: Winds 25 to 35 mph last 24 hours. Causing poor thermal performance. Sea of grey. The critters show up fine, but the terrain is fuzzy and shades of grey.


    Equipment: .22LR(16) with ODIN 17mm 1x 320(30) on M69 mount. Eley 36gr hp sub.


    [​IMG]


    Activity: Around behind the barn saw rat at 10yds, aim for top of back (zeroed at 25yds, have to hold up between 0-10yds). Rat thrashed around and then dead,

    From 40yds saw larger than rat sized critter behind run attached to coop. But did not want to shoot thru run (steel grating). So shuffled to the right and stood still for 2 min and repeated. I think critter noticed me, it stopped and looked, but I was still. Eventually I shuffled enough to get a line of fire then fired and it dropped. Turned out to be a giant jackrabbit. The rat looks tiny compared to the rabbit. The rat was hand length (not counting tail) but not full hand width. Rabbit was the largest Jackrabbit I've seen. If you hang with the rats and act like the rats, you get shot like the rats.


    [​IMG]


    Continued along creek bank and saw rat and bird in a bush. Continued to approach. The rat climbed higher into the center of the bush, the bird flew away. At 20yds stopped and fired at rat, he feel down onto the ground. This bush is about 20 feet across and he was in the middle of it and it is a prickly bush, so waited until morning to fish him out with a stick and take all the pics. This was a larger rat. Full hand sized. Had been well fed.


    [​IMG]


    Results/Summary: The M-69 mount is a game changer compared to using the PVS-14 ring mount as a weapons mount for the ODIN. There is some play in the ring mount. If running PVS-14 behind an EOTECH, the play is not an issue because the reticle is in the EOTECH. But with the ODIN, the play was causing 2 inches of random POI shift at 25yds and some of the mice I shoot at are 2 inches long, so that amount of play is a show stopper. The M-69 mount fixes the problem. Thanks for Pete at I2 for suggesting.
    With the acquisition of the Patrol, the ODIN is now the backup intermediate distance head mounted scanner and so can switch primary purpose to being on the .22lr as the rat gun.
     
  17. wigwamitus

    wigwamitus LSB Active Member

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    2018-03-05
    2130-2230
    30F
    25 MPH W

    Goal: Coop overwatch.

    Environment: Wind still averaging 25-35 it dies down a bit, then it picks up a bit. Clear skies tonight, Orion to the West.

    Equipment: I decided to bring more gun tonight. I am prepping for night walk this coming weekend so using 5.56(10.3) for that, so have it torn down cleaning. So took
    6.5G(18), L&S 3-18x T-3, UTC-x RA{TAR. 123 AMAX. M055 Tripod with 322RC2 head.

    [​IMG]

    Activity: Went out and setup tripod in the center of the building area. This offers fields of fire in all directions, between all the buildings: 415 meters up hill to the West, 1700 meters to the west, 250 meters to the S and 600 meters to the North. To the East is a wood and I can see critters about 200-250 meters into the woods depending on how large they area.
    So, I was scanning about nucing and zooming in and out and checking distances with the RAPTAR and focusing. After about 30mins, I was still scanning and was on 3x so I had the widest FOV. I saw a fairly larger critter moving in the woods. When you see a critter in these woods, you see bits and pieces of it through the gaps in the vegetation so you can't usually tell what it is. I see a lot of deer traversing through there, so I figured it was a deer but it could've been one of my cows, they sometimes move along the banks of the creek back there. I continued to watch, but the critter must have gone behind an embankment about 100 meters into the woods and I could no longer see it. It was heading north towards the alfalfa patch. I scanned back and forth, from where I saw the critter - to the alfalfa patch, waiting to catch a glimpse of it. Eventually it appeared near the fence and approached the fence. I still thought it was a deer, but noted it was a small one. Then it passed through the fence (not over) and in to the open and starting trotting across the alfalfa patch now heading West. I could tell it was a yote by size and trot and tail. I used the "trap" lead. I estimated 110 meters and I was aiming slightly down so I held level with the jaw and fired right before the nose reached my cross hair. The front half of the yote went straight down. I checked the distance with the RAPTAR - it was 141 meters, farther than I thought! Then I took the setup in the house and grabbed the 4-wheeler to go check the yote. The alfalfa patch is on the other side of the creek and across a fence, so easier to get there on the 4-wheeler across bridge thru gate 1/4 mile away.

    The entrance wound is on the neck.

    [​IMG]

    The exit wound on the shoulder as I was on the critters front left quarter when I fired. The AMAX round still has a nasty exit wound on a yote.

    [​IMG]

    He was a pretty scrawny yote, but it has been a cold winter with 2 weeks of sub 20F weather 24x7 and a week of ice also sub 20F. Distance to the coop from the gun on the tripod was 41 meters, and the yote was about 15 degrees to the right so just over 100 meters from the coop and heading towards the apple orchard in the general direction of the coop, but other side of the creek bed.

    Results/Summary: Well 3x was plenty of magnification. But even though I know a lot of distances on my land, once they get out in the alfalfa patch ... an 18 acre flat field, there are few landmarks. I need to learn to push the range button before I shoot, that's why the dang raptar is on there. But this was the first critter I ever shot with it on there and I was focused on the critter. But I was out there practicing with it and checking ranges and seeing them with my support eye while keeping my aiming eye looking thru the scope. It can be done and I was practicing it. Just not once the yote showed up :D
     
  18. wigwamitus

    wigwamitus LSB Active Member

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    CORRECTION: It has been pointed out to me that the above rabbit is a cotton tail ... still he was a large one !!
     
    Last edited: Mar 6, 2018
  19. wigwamitus

    wigwamitus LSB Active Member

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    2018-03-10/11
    2200-0200
    20F

    Goal: Team night walk

    Environment: The property was about 400 meters wide by 800 meters long. There was a hill in the center of the property. The land was very rough with large boulders, gullies, fallen trees and the woods where thick with lots of close interlocking branches. There was a rough "road" thru the property. This was a no moon night as moon rise would happen at 3am after our scheduled stop time.

    Equipment: I had PVS-14 and IR-Patrol on Helmet and 5.56(10.3) with Mk3 60mm. Also had pack with water bladder, protein bars, first aid kit. Had USGI compass and pace beads on outside gear.

    [​IMG]

    Blue had two 4 man teams and Red had one 4 man team. Red would be setup in a camp in roughly the middle of the property near the North side of the top of the hill.
    Blue Team 01 rode in a vehicle to the South end of the property. BLue Team 02 would move on foot from the North end of the property.
    IIRC 8 people had at least one PVS-14. The two blue team had 2 thermals for each team (4 total) and the Red team had one thermal. 4 people had no helmet mounted NODs.

    We all had USGI BFA on our weapons and no ammo.
    Each Team leader had a radio.
    The Team leads all had some land nav and comms experience.

    Activity:

    After an initial safety briefing, we split up into team and performed a practice walk. We walked about 100 meters up hill along with road, then the various team split up and went into the woods for about another 100 meters. This got us used to moving and communicating in teams.
    We then returned to base.

    The OPFOR team (Red) were also the referees. They gave each team lead their orders and then there was some planning time. Our team had a map and plotted out our planned route.
    I would start out as tail end charlie (#4) and would be doing 360s periodically. The team would pause if needed to let me catch up. I gave my carbine + mk3 to #3 ... the team leader was #2 ... and point was #1.
    The second thermal with #3 would enable the team lead, who only had 1xPVS-14 to quickly request a thermal check of a given area. I would be able to continue to check flanks and rear or help double check and area of interest.

    Team 2s start point was the North center of the property. We would to march to a point designated as "OP" in the center East side of the property. Then "link up" with team 01. Locate the enemy camp, then coordinate an assault.

    We worked out the planned line of march within our team and passwords, etc. with the other team. Team #2 and the OPFOR team then departed in a vehicle.

    Our team started out on foot. The team leader called a halt quickly as the radio was not working, so everyone when down in kneeling/holding position in 360 coverage. After working with the radio and changing the batteries, we then resumed our march. We were going up a steep gully full of big boulders, trees and branches. It was slow going. #3 and #4 were supposed to be counting beads but it was tough in this terrain. We took frequent listening breaks. We hydrated and I did more 360s to make sure no critters were visible. After about 175 meters, the team leader did a longer halt, checked the map, did a radio check with the other team, asked for our bead counts (I had 1 but was thinking of clicking the second #3 had 2). Then we departed from the large gully and headed NE into the woods. The woods were thick with overlapping branches, lots of downed trees and branches and lots of boulders big and small. Big like the size of a person, small like the size of a foot ball. I continued to do as many 360s as I could. I expected the OPFOR to not be in the camp, but instead to be out trying to sneak up on our flanks and rear, so I was checking that out as much as possible.
    At some point, we could see the top of the hill, due to some ambient light (another house on another property) on the other side of the hill. The team lead then changed the order of march, I was now #1 and the former point was now #4. Presumably, contact was expected and my helmet mounted thermal would be able to detect earliest. So I requested direction of march and got a point. Started moving. Selecting the route thru the trees, branches, down trees/branches boulders took most of my attention, but I stopped and did 90 degree forward scans every few steps. Eventually, I detected a critter and went down. The other critter went down also and I knew we were dealing with humans. I told the team lead we had one human to our front at about 20 meters. I continued to watch the human, the TL got on the radio. The human started waving, I told the team lead. After more radio chatter, the TL rose up and headed towards the human. another human rose up and headed towards the team lead. I could then see 3 humans from another team.
    #3 and #4 from our team had closed up and I let them know what was happening. I asked #3 to check flanks and rear with thermal. Eventually our TL waved us forward and I told #3 and #4 TL was calling us forward and we should move now.
    We did and the link up was completed. Team two then proceeded almost directly North from the link up position and I quickly saw "something" due West so we went down again. I was looking under a downed tree and saw definite critter.
    I then looked over the top of the tree and saw two humans and a fire, very clearly.
    The critter under the tree was something else.
    So TL called Tm 01 and then told me to advance directly towards the camp. I did, except I found a path where LOS was blocked by numerous trees close to the LOS saw followed that path. As soon as we started moving a hawk flew up from its meal (probably rat) and screeched and later during AAR everyone said they heard it. Camp was 50 yds. We advanced half that distance then halted, them both team leads called for the assault and we went on line and advanced while shouting "bang bang" ... I got to about 10yds and saw one human roll off the top of a huge boulder and crash to the ground ... very realistic looking!
    When were then on the objective and the exercise was over. It turned out the TL#1 had fallen off the back side of a giant boulder by mistake. I had assumed it was part of the simulation but it was a real fall. Fortunately, he was not injured, beyond some scrapes.
    We then lined up and marched back out of the woods in our three teams and back to the start point. About 300 meters?
    We then did AAR. OPFOR said they could not hear us moving thru the woods. They saw us with their thermal (EO Tech 320) before they heard us. That was most surprising as We thought we were making huge amounts of crashing noise in the woods.
    My usual shooting buddy James, was point on Team #1 when it turned out, I was point for team #2 and we both worked out that we saw each other and the same time and both went down at the same time. He was the one I saw waving.
    Team #1 had been able to walk to the link up position from the vehicle debark point down the "road" so they never had to crash thru the woods except during the assault, whereas my team spent a solid 90m moving uphill thru the woods.

    Results/Summary: Besides Hog hunting, this is the first time I have done a night exercise with >2 people with NV/thermal. So, it was very interesting seeing three groups of 4 trying to coordinate their activities. And I have to say it was largely successful.
    The main issue I saw was intra-team comms. Our TL was trying to talk very quietly. My balaklava was preventing my hearing 80% of his words, so I had to deduce. I probably got about 60% from gestures or explicit hand signals, but not all of it. Having a second intrateam radio net with everyone having headsets etc. would solve this issue.
    The first guy we had on point did an amazing job feeling his way through the woods as he had no NODs. Our #3 had no NOD on head, but he had my 60mm thermal, so he could see well when we were halted, but not so well when we were moving. We all deployed cats eyes on our rear facing equipment to help team mates see man in front of them.
    The frequent listening breaks let me hydrate and catch my breadth. I was surprised I did not get exhausted to the point of issue during the exercise, I left my 20s behind more than 3 weeks ago!
    James had 2xPVS14 and a COTI on his head and a PATROL on his carbine. He had an issue with the COTI mount. He also decided to stow the 14 + COTI in his bag about 2/3rds of the way thru the exercise to give him more peripheral vision. Perhaps I should've done that, but I wanted the thermal up there to detect.
    Team #1 were in position and stationary when he/I spotted each other and he was scanning with patrol on carbine. We spotted each other with our patrols.
    None of my team members fell, despite the rough terrain. In walking around in my woods which are similar, I've developed the technique of holding on to branches to keep me upright. I can tell by how the branches bend how much weight they can bear, do not have to see them. And this helped me a lot especially when I was point.
    Also, when pushing way through entertwined branches I turn around and push thru with my back, this is easier and branches aren't scrapping my face.
    It was an interesting exercise.
     
  20. wigwamitus

    wigwamitus LSB Active Member

    Joined:
    Nov 1, 2014
    Messages:
    1,109
    For the first time evah I was able to download still images from an OASYS core device!



    These are from the above night walk, from the patrol on my head.



    ==

    Teams in the prep area

    [​IMG]



    ==

    Blue Team 2 (my team) heading out in order of March, Point (#1), Team Lead with radio (#2), #3 with my mk3 60mm and I am #4 taking the pic.

    [​IMG]





    ==

    Back at base chatting after the exercise

    [​IMG]
     

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