Guide to "LEAD" Shooting moving targets.

Discussion in 'Hog Hunting Tactics & Tips' started by TEXASLAWMAN, Nov 20, 2014.

  1. TEXASLAWMAN

    TEXASLAWMAN TEXAS LSB TURKEY BUZZARD PRESERVATION SOCIETY SUS VENATOR CLUB LoneStarBoars Supporter TEAM OinK

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    Yes most thermal scopes are at least 2x but I usually use the 3x or 4x
     
  2. Richard Teague

    Richard Teague New Member

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    Afraid to watch the video, might cause me to figure out why I hit running animals so well. When I was much younger I shot a lot of running jackrabbits and somehow figured out how to make tough running shots without even thinking about it.
     
  3. Tbar

    Tbar New Member

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    My shots are from a fixed position 200 yard from the feeder.

    A friend of mine calculated my hogs would hit 30mph burst speed in short order.
    It takes ~ .25 second for my projectile to get there.
    Thus my lead needs to be 11 feet or ~3 pig lengths.

    I still have not mastered that lead yet.
     
  4. Brian Shaffer

    Brian Shaffer Pro Staff Third Coast Thermal SUS VENATOR CLUB LoneStarBoars Supporter

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    I wish it was that simple. I can visually see hogs running at 3 different speeds and the distinction between the three can't always be grouped in MPH. The low speed run is a trot where they are just moving away and don't seem to understand what it going on. There is a mid speed run where they appear to be fleeing, but not actually reacting like they are about to die. They are just moving away from danger, quickly. Then there is the balls-to-the-wall 30 mph run where they feel directly threatened like they are being chased.

    When you shoot at them, the don't always go from zero to flat out full speed. That is part of the problem. On top of that, they don't always run at a constant speed once they start running.

    Then there is the problem of vertical changes. Hogs often have a lot of vertical change when they run fast. Depending on the timing of the shot and how much change is being produced, your head level shot could impact at belly level.

    It is going to take practice. It would probably be beneficial if you tried to learn from a shorter distance.
     
  5. Richard Teague

    Richard Teague New Member

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    If I'm shooting around cattle or houses I don't take running shots but if the field is wide open I will burn ammo! The longest running shot I took on a hog was a spotted 200 pounder running flat out up a hill toward the timber. I pulled my 7x57 out of the case jacked a round in and rolled that hog. Range around 200 yards and I fired just as my crosshairs were a hog length in front. I was swinging the rifle faster than it looked like the hog was traveling and did not stop my swing. It was one of the cool looking rolling end over end hits in front of witnesses. It could have been luck but I was shooting at that hog, he was the only one in sight!
     
    Tbar likes this.

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